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Inspired by the Story: An Interview with Anne De Wolf and the Kitzis-Strasfeld Family


“Designed by Portland’s most renowned architect, A.E. Doyle, this home creates a harmonious marriage of the grand and majestic spaces found in palatial mansions with the warmth and ease of lifestyle prevalent in the Craftsman cottage.” – Dan Volkmer

Moving from their beloved Victorian home in Goose Hollow, Lynne, Alex and their two children, Margot and Anderson, have lived in their current home for over 3 years now. After being referred by Dan Volkmer to Anne De Wolf as a talented designer who specializes in historic remodels, they began a whole-house remodel with Arciform.

“What we liked most about Anne was she knew her stuff when it came to historic home restoration, but she also had a funky flair about her designs,” says Alex as I step into the gorgeous home built in 1909 by local architect A.E. Doyle. Doyle also designed the Multnomah County Central Library, the Meier & Frank Building and the famous Benson Bubblers!

I notice wallpapers that are a clear trademark of Anne’s style and relish in the light, fun and sophisticated feel the Kitzis-Strasfeld home emanates.

This striking L’Oiseau Moderne wallpaper epitomizes the most exuberant Deco style that was popular between 1925-1930. “When done right, historic preservation is never boring,” says Anne.

Lynne Strasfeld and Alex Kitzis are doctors. They’re used to chaos and high stress situations. I keep this in mind when they tell me they chose to live in the home throughout the remodel.

“Living in the home during construction allowed us to be a part of the process, and we were able to make on-the-fly decisions and adjustments to the remodel plan,” Lynne tells me.

“Things like adding a counter below the microwave in the kitchen and replacing the mudroom were decided in-the-moment,” says Alex.


The original mudroom was rebuilt as part of the addition with, tile flooring and walls and built-ins. “The home has many small efficient spaces coupled with large public rooms,” says Anne

“And best of all, Jamie and Adam [Arciform’s lead carpenter and project manager on the project] were always respectful of our space; in the end they became like family,” Lynne says

Two weeks ago I was here getting photos of the home for both Arciform and interior designer Jenna Sheingold. During the photoshoot I played ping-pong in the fully finished basement with 9-year-old son Anderson – he shamelessly beat me five times in a row.

12-year-old Margot showed me her beautiful bedroom. I notice the light sea green ceiling (painted in Benjamin Moore’s Neon Celery) and the attached bathroom with beautiful details like classic white hexagonal tiles with black accents on the floor, the Carrara marble shower threshold and pretty wall-mounted sink by Duravit. The walls have been painted in Ice Blue by Benjamin Moore.

“I like how light and bright my room is,” says Margot.

Today I’m at the home with the Lynne, Alex, Anne, photographer Christopher Dibble and their cheerful golden retriever, Sadie. We’re getting a few more photos, and I’m learning more about the remodel. Anne brought pastries from Ken’s Artisan Bakery and we sit down to enjoy them in the garden room and chat more about the home.


What I love most about these interviews is hearing Anne talk about historical architecture. First of all, she has a charming German accent. Second, she knows her stuff and is passionate about design.

The remodel included expanding along one wall of the kitchen by three feet, removing a wall from the dining area to the living area, adding a new family room and bathroom to the basement and restoring historical details such as the oak hardwood flooring, large, west-facing windows and the pass-through butler’s pantry, among other things.

“The Kitzis-Strasfelds loved their previous home as well. They moved from an old Victorian just ½ mile from their new house. They were especially fond of their former kitchen with its cozy nook, so we took those elements and carried them into their new home. We expanded the kitchen, added wainscoting and banquette seating to the existing nook and used the same paint color—Gaelic Garden by Columbia Paints,” says Anne.


The existing kitchen with butler’s pantry has been updated to modern standards while respecting the vintage of the home

As we exit the house through the cheery red front door, Lynne tells me, “we had many happy hours sitting in our old kitchen, and now we feel the same about our new kitchen.”

This house is on the Ainsworth Holiday Home Tour which happens this Thursday, 11/30! Be sure to check it out.

Written by Snow Blackwood

Photo Gallery (photos by Christopher Dibble):


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PianoRoom_KitzisBoy copy





First Repair Café a Success!

The first Repair Café event is under our collective belts. And it was a blast! Huge sigh of relief. Huge. Right on, Portland!

repair sign

There was a little hiccup in the beginning as the repair tables and equipment were blocking NE 17th Ave, per the fire marshal. Damn rules and regulations! Safety first? Who cares about that stuff? (Well, people do.) The group did a quick bit of juggling and planted the two tents in front of the Umoja Center. Things were up and running by 6:30pm.


What with the tents, tables and chairs, signs and equipment and tools brought by the repair volunteers, the group definitely displayed a presence. I’m not sure the Last Thursday habituées were prepared to see a sewing machine – complete with a seamstress – plus disassembled computers at the (depending on when you dropped by) hippie/ster festival (or, perhaps, debauched event) that is Alberta Street once a month in the summer.
The sewing machines and computers did offer certain appeal. Pretty soon, people were stopping by to ask What’s going on? The answer?

It’s a Repair Event – Renee and Terra are sewing, Bryce is working on electronics, and JD is showing people how to polish and care for their shoes. We’re keeping things out of the landfill, baby! Do you have anything that needs fixin’?

One gentleman dropped off his jacket for Renee to repair and picked it up on his way back down the street, but this time around it was mostly the volunteers who got their stuff fixed. And that’s cool – volunteers are repair-worthy! (FYI – that’s a good reason to volunteer! Handle the mailing list, baby, and get your computer fixed. Perfect trade.) People saw the group, added their names to the mailing list, AND they found a lot of prospective volunteers in the crowd. Not a bad night’s work!


The next event is at Ford Food and Drink on Thursday, June 20th. Check it out on the RepairPDX site, which is now live. Look around – you know you’ve got something that needs repair. Go have a coffee and get ‘er done. FYI – check out what the crew will be offering on June 20:

Jewelry Repair
Bike Repair
Small Appliance Repair
Plus, Becky, the owner of Ford, will also be doing free résumé editing. Nice.

And, a big shout-out / thank you to Grand Central Bakery in Beaumont for the much appreciated and much needed food during the inaugural event!

A Repair Cafe for PDX


I love Portland! Just when I think we’ve reached our maximum quotient of hip, cool, nerdy individuals, great restaurants and diverse events, this thriving metropolis adds something new to the mix.

Sit down for this proclamation: Portland is not perfect.

I know. Crazy, right?

But Portland has been missing something. A place that everyone needs and needs to love – a Repair Café. These cafés exist in Europe, where people stop by the venue on designated nights to have a coffee and get their toasters repaired. Or the hole in their sweater darned, or perhaps a ripped piece of drapery fixed. Like-minded citizens volunteer their services and skills in an effort to keep goods in good working order and out of the landfill. People stay busy, connected, and perhaps well-hydrated (or, at least well-caffeinated). Pretty cool.


Sounds like such a simple concept – and one that simply must exist in Portland, the greenest, grooviest city around. Palo Alto has a Repair Café. But when I started snooping around, I found out Portland didn’t. The world was clearly out of balance! And then a group of like-minded individuals started contacting people around town who had expressed interest in Repair Cafés. They got the ball rolling. Meetings ensued, and damn, they got this crazy-smart idea started up right here. With the help of people from Metro, anti-plastic crusaders, the Reuse Alliance, people who know how to repair (you name it), the Tool Library (do you have a tool inventory like my dad or Ace Hardware in the pics above? I do not!) and many others, the first Repair Node event (a Café is still in the works) will take place at Alberta’s Last Thursday event on May 30th. The repair experts – a sturdy team of volunteers – will be at work from 5:30 to 8:00pm on NE 17th Avenue and Alberta Street strategically perched between the Community Cycling Center and the Umoja Center.

Years and years ago, I saw Sex, Lies, and Videotape at the theater. (Yes, I’m that old.) In one scene, Andie MacDowell is discussing the many reasons she cannot sleep, and one item on her list (per my imperfect memory) was I think about everything in the landfills. How long can we keep putting stuff in landfills? Well, I felt like I’d met a kindred spirit. I’m one of those dorks who looks in my garbage can and says, How do I cut this in half? I hate the mountains of garbage we are creating. When and why did it become OK to toss everything at the first sign of wear and tear? Let’s reverse that trend. And to that end I will be taking holey sweaters to Last Thursday, baby. I’m going to take the right thread, too, just in case there’s a darner there with time on his or her hands. Which brings us to the actual repairing.

For this first outing the group will likely be providing:

  • shoe polishing (shoe repair to follow)
  • sewing (bring those draperies!)
  • and computer repair.

The group is working on adding small electronics repair to the mix (don’t throw out your broken toaster just yet), as well as toy and jewelry repair, plus much more.

The second Repair Café event is planned for June 20th at Ford Food and Drink from 630 to 900PM. More information to follow.

If you are curious about the logistics of a Repair Café, please check out the website for the Repair Café in Palo Alto. See the list of items that can commonly be repaired, plus the caveats they have delineated.

And then sit back and think about landfills and our disposable culture. How can you help avoid wasting? How you can fix something that ain’t (that) broke? Repair rather than tossing! Perhaps you would like to repair goods in an altruistic, nerdy, authentically PDX way, but have no fix-it skills to speak of. Perhaps you have a skill that would help operations run smoothly?

Well, volunteers are also needed to check people in, keep things moving, set up, take down, you name it. Perhaps you actually do have other marketable skills. Do you solder, sew, tinker, fix bikes? If you do, check out the Repair Node Facebook page and consider volunteering (the website will be up soon at Or stop by NE Alberta Street on May 30th or Ford Food and Drink on June 20th to talk to the team. We would love to see you. And, you’ll get a kick out of all the stuff that can be fixed and learn more from the people who fix all that stuff.

About Nancy Ranchel

Nancy is an accountant who offsets the practicality of her day job with extravagant and outrageous remodeling projects, often involving massive amounts of scrap metal.  In her free time she can be found dreaming up new ways to turn her house into an art installation, digging through scrap heaps, and contemplating a world without plastic. Check out Nancy’s blog here:

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Alphabet District Historic Home Walking Tour this Weekend

NWNCC.NWCT_Home Tour_Poster w.Bleed_R4v2 Facebok

It’s going to be a beautiful weekend, and we have a recommendation for how to make the most of it.

Arciform is pleased to sponsor this walking tour in support of the NW Neighborhood Cultural Center (home to the excellent Northwest Children’s Theater and School).

Here are all the details:

When: Sunday, May 5th 11 am -4 pm

Where: The Historic NW Alphabet District!
Cost: $25.00

Details: Look inside 8 historic properties and find out unique and fascinating tid-bits that helped shapeone of Portland’s first historic districts. Get your tickets at the box office at the NW Children’s Theater, 1819 NW Everett Street, 97209 or 503-222-4480. 100% of the proceeds go towards the restoration of the Historic NW Cultural Center, which also houses the NW Children’s Theater.

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Give Your House a Voice


If your house could speak, what do you hope it would say?

Would it be a cheeky affirmation?


Or a friendly reminder?


Maybe just a morning directive:


Whatever the message, consider giving your home a voice with light up letter forms that spell out the feelings that are close to your heart.


Arciform client and good friend Maria Hardison decided to create her first set of these charming light up letters as a surprise gift for her husband. They now grace the wall in their basement family room.

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That project proved so popular with friends that soon she was creating custom letters for friends and business contacts. There’s Maria in the photo above, working with her friend (and now business partner) Tom.


Then, after the “Pig Out” sign she created for new Portland restaurant Lardo was featured in a ton of great reviews, she decided to get serious.

The result: now she has launched a business creating custom vintage look marquee letters  you can purchase to illuminate your home and give it a voice.

So… if your home could speak to every guest who stops buy… what would YOU like it to say?

Tell us the 3 word phrase you’d want your home to shout from the rooftops (in glowing marquee letters) in the comments below and you’ll be entered to win a FREE custom letter light of your choice from Maria’s new company.


You can check out Maria’s new website and get the details on creating your own custom sign here.

Explore some other options for adding letter forms into your home design in our Pinterest gallery.

We can’t wait to hear what your home would say if it could speak!

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A Volunteer Weekend for Arciform

174 Kim Larsen after paint disaster

Last weekend several Arciform and Versatile Wood Products staffers contributed their Saturday to a national volunteer event called ReBuilding Together. The project provides essential safety repairs to low income homeowners, many of whom are facing health or disability challenges. Our crew worked alongside 100s of other volunteers who tackled 47 projects throughout the Portland metro area. Here’s a note from our Team Captain, Kate Thornton, about the day and what the team was able to accomplish.

Dear RT House #174 Volunteers,

If you googled “Rebuilding Together” in the news Saturday, you learned stories of over 250,000 volunteers with more than 200 RT affiliates across the country that collectively tweaked the aura of the world.  Well, who really knows about that last part, but I hope you felt a good sense of accomplishment and a burning desire to come play again this time next year.   In the meantime, follow National RT on Twitter @rebldgtogthr.

174 RT 2013 House 174 Group picture

About half of our crew was first-time RTers.  Thank you for stepping out and we hope to see you again for many future Aprils.  One of the best things about RT is that they/we are able to organize and deliver $4 of value to our community for every $1 in donations.  Volunteers see the direct impact of their efforts and get to bond in the process.

Together, the volunteers at House #147 accomplished the following (in a single day!):

  • Spread two yards of gravel in driveway
  • Mow grass
  • Patch broken siding
  • Repair gutters/downspouts
  • Replace laundry room lighting
  • Rewire several outlets
  • Replace bathroom floor down to joists
  • Edge sidewalk
  • Spread word of RT to neighbors
  • Pull weeds
  • Prune bushes
  • Paint house exterior
  • Repair storm door & latch
  • Replace dryer vent & ducting
  • Insulate laundry room
  • Plug drain leak
  • Clean patio furniture
  • Re-support front roof overhang
  • Hang new clothes line
  • Patch sheetrock holes
  • Replace four broken windows
  • Install kitchen fire extinguisher
  • Replace kitchen sink strainer & drain
  • Repair & adjust kitchen cabinet doors
  • Repair wall panels next to range and stairs
  • Add electrical covers
  • Replace two toilets with ADA “water sense” models
  • Install Smoke & Carbon Monoxide alarms

Not too shabby for a day’s work!

A few other notes from the Team Captain:

Kim takes home the award for “Biggest Disaster” for leaving her paint container on top of the ladder and dumping it on her head while moving the ladder.  She is about 50 years too early to be sporting blue hair, but you can get away with it here in Portland.

174 New basement toilet

Shaun and Wallace win the uncontested “Git ‘er Done Hero” award for embracing the day’s yuckiest task of removing the plugged basement toilet that was unspeakably vile and frothy.

174 Bathroom floor 1 174 Bathroom Floor 2 Jeramy 174 Bathroom Floor 3 Jeramy and George 174 Bathroom Floor 4

Arciform’s Jeramy Bashaw wins the “Nice Guy” award for trading his lunch break for a Home Depot run so that he and fellow Arciform men could finish rebuilding the upstairs bathroom floor that had rotted through to the basement.

Tim wins “Quote of the day” with: “That bush was dead.  It just didn’t know it yet.”

“The Miracle Award” goes to Diane and her landscaping crew for uncovering a lovely yard under a jungle of dandelions and unruly overgrowth.

174 House front after 2

“Honorable Mention” goes to Teresa and Steve who spent most of their beautiful Saturday slaving with ductwork and insulation in the dark basement laundry room.

174 New insulation and ducting

While the sun was still high in the sky, the house along with its very grateful owner had a new lease on life. A trailer full of supplies, 32 donuts, a gallon of coffee and 36 sandwiches had been devoured and the dumpster was full.  At the final sweep, only one lonely banana and a single bottle of water remained.  It was a good day.

174 Full Dumpster

Arciform was joined in supporting this incredibly valuable project by the following organizations:

Port of Portland

Tim’s Urban Bees

Wallace Rainey, General Contractor

Kaizen Home Improvement (Kate)

Providence Occupational Therapy

RED’S Electric

PS from Kate: If you would like to get involved with this excellent organization, please go to this website and say “yes!”  There is a big need for people to help screen all the applicants between October and March.  Of all the applicants this year, there were 185 who made it to the home inspections/interview phase, which were then pared down to ~47 successfully completed projects.

We were honored to have the opportunity to participate in the work of this excellent organization and we encourage you to find out more about their good work here.

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Vote for Heceta Head out of Canned Goods


Check out Arciform’s scale model of Heceta Head Lighthouse made out of Campbell’s soup cans! Compare it to the real deal here:


Practically identical right?

Here’s the view from above:


Help us win the People’s Choice Award (and check out the other cool structures designed and built by local architecture and construction firms) by “liking” the picture of our project in the Facebook Album here.


Check out how the team managed to replicate the inset windows in the work house and create the “red tile roof” out of tomato sauce cans.

You can watch Arciform and Ankrom Moisan in action (and get a look at how the structure was put together) with this video clip from KPTV’s Joe on the Go.

Deep thanks to the Interstate Fred Meyer for helping us secure our cans and congratulations to the Arciform and Ankrom Moisan Team, who were up at 4 am on Monday to stack their way to Historic Preservation success, all in support of a great cause!

Why Heceta Head Lighthouse, you ask? We had the honor of restoring doors, millwork and flooring in the lighthouse in partnership with our sister company Versatile Wood Products.

Here are a few images from that project:







We invite you to check out our team’s hard work at Pioneer Place Mall. The Canstruction projects will be available to view (and vote!) through April 27th, 2013.

We are so proud to participate in a project that does so much good for Oregon’s most Vulnerable Families. Join us in supporting the Oregon Food Bank.


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Which Historic Preservation Project will Arciform Celebrate at Canstruction this Year?

On Monday, April 22nd (at 4 AM!) Arciform will team up with Ankrom Moisan Architects to build an 8 foot tall structure entirely out of canned goods.

Its all in support of the Oregon Food Bank, and you can check out the results of our work all next week at Pioneer Place Mall.

Which iconic Oregon Landmark will we be recreating out of cans of soup, green beans and tomato sauce?

Here’s a hint:


Wish us luck!

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Celebrating Saul Zaik

(This kitchen was restored by Arciform for the owners of the Feldman House, a home built by architect Saul Zaik in the ’50s that is considered a quintessential example of the Northwest Regional Modernism style.)

One of the pleasures (and challenges) of working in older homes as we often do, is the weight of history that can hang over each renovation and restoration choice we make with our clients.

Each space has its own distinct personality, and sometimes that personality shines straight through from the original builder’s intent. Other times, the space has been papered over with updates that mask the original style and purpose of the home. In every case, we must strike a balance between:

1. Recognizing that a home is a living building that must first and foremost serve the needs of the family living in it.

2. Respecting the fact that a home also has a unique history and perspective that adds to its value and should be preserved whenever possible.

Sometimes you get lucky and have the opportunity to work on a home whose architect’s purpose and design goals are so clear, thoughtful, practical and beautiful that 60 years later the home still feels fresh and new.

darin brown 004

(Here is an image from of the Feldman House kitchen before the renovation. )

arc18-1f(Here’s a similar view after the restoration was completed. Like many of our projects, our goal here was to integrate needed updates as subtly as possible into the existing space. If you can’t tell where the original elements end and the new things begin, we have done our work well!)

Saul Zaik, a Portland architect responsible for many iconic houses in the style that has come to be called “Northwest Regional Modernism,” creates  homes that are full of personality distinctive style and yet prioritize the comfort of the people who inhabit them and the landscapes on which they are sited.

Portland Monthly explains:

Mid-century modernism is a popular style, often seen as retro, a look back or a revival of something that started more than half a century ago. But in some ways, here in Portland, there’s nothing retro about it. Northwest Regional Modernism is simply a vibrant approach to architecture and design. It thrives, continues to evolve, and is aging gracefully.

change(This image, of Saul Zaik’s personal residence, perfectly illustrates that combination of human scale and connection to the NW environment that was a hallmark of his work.)

Brian Libby, a passionate Portland architecture advocate,  shares this insight into Saul Zaik’s take on Northwest Regional Modernism on the blog PortlandModern:

Asked if he thinks northwest regional is a valid style, Zaik’s response comes without hesitation.

“It is absolutely valid,” he says. “It is site-oriented in terms of sun and weather. It respects the vegetation of the site. Our attitude was that the best thing you can do is something nobody can see as they drive down the street. Well, I shouldn’t say that. Maybe it is better to say that it is something discreet. I think it has to do with a northwest lifestyle. Our clients were outdoor people, who appreciated the landscape and wanted to be connected to it and to preserve it.”

In addition to many distinctive Portland residences, Zaik was deeply influential in the design of some of Oregon’s iconic resort locations, including Sunriver, Salishan, Timberline Lodge (for their 1960’s addition) and the adaptive restoration of the Crater Lake Lodge grounds. Chances are, if you have vacationed in Oregon, you’re experience has been enhanced by his unique sense of place.


About the Feldman House

One of Zaik’s first houses to come out of this period, the circa-1956 Feldman House, is one of his most celebrated and one he still recalls fondly. Built for Philip Feldman, heir to Mt. Hood Borax Company, the structure has a cantilevered, low-pitched gable roof and vertical tongue-and-groove cedar siding. Its broad overhanging eaves express the sheltering element that Zaik brought with him from his University of Oregon studies and which he considered fundamental to the style.

“It is extremely modern in using very flush surfaces and wide panes of glass,” notes architect Don Rouzie, one of Zaik’s longtime collaborators. “It is very simple. It doesn’t jump out at you as being this terrific thing. But you get in there, and it’s just awesome. You realize what northwest regional means.” The house was honored by the Oregon chapter of the American Institute of Architects and was featured in an issue of Pacific Architect magazine. It was also was featured on the 2008 Street of Eames Homes Tour and garnered much praise as a crowd favorite.

We deeply enjoyed participating in the preservation of this iconic Portland residence and we are delighted to join with the Historic Preservation League of Oregon to celebrate Saul Zaik on their upcoming Mid-Century Marvelous Tour of several key Zaik residences on May 11th.

Unfortunately the Feldman House is undergoing some additional restoration and will not be available for viewing on the tour, but there are several other Zaik houses (including his own personal residence) that will be showcased.

We encourage you to check out the tour, which is a fundraiser for the important preservation work being carried forward by the Historic Preservation League of Oregon.

zaik home 2


When: May 11th 10 am to 4 pm

Cost: $40 per person  ($30 for HPLO members)

Buy Tickets Here.

Details from the Historic Preservation League of Oregon:

Take advantage of a unique opportunity to visit six outstanding Northwest Regional Modern homes designed by Saul Zaik.

Tour goers will appreciate the beauty of these houses and how they take full advantage of their wooded locations. They are all recommended by Saul himself and include his own home.

Check in at the Portland First United Methodist Church in Goose Hollow (1838 SW Jefferson) where, at 1pm, we will also present a lecture on Saul’s work and the Northwest Regional style.

This will be a driving tour. The homes are in Portland’s west hills and there are some steep driveways and walkways.

After the tour there will be a “Snappy Hour” ’60s themed costume party and cocktail hour, where tour goers will have an opportunity to meet Zaik and ask questions about the homes on the tour.

We  hope you will join us in celebrating this true icon of Northwest architectural style.

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Let’s Go to the Theater!

Clybourne Park

What stories does your house have to tell? What role does your neighborhood, its unique history and the larger community play in defining what happens to your home, even after you buy it?

Preservationists, neighborhood associations, neighbors and families collide in this award winning hit Portland Center Stage comedy about the complex life (and impending demise) of a nearly 100 year old home in Chicago.

You are cordially invited to join Anne, Richard and the Arciform crew at the April 30th 7:30 pm performance, which will feature a post-show discussion about preservation in Portland’s changing neighborhoods.

Here’s the details from PCS about the performance and the discussion, which will include Arciform owner Richard De Wolf.

Join Arciform  at Clybourne Park
with a post-show discussion about preservation in Portland’s changing neighborhoods
April 30th at 7:30 pm
Portland Center Stage
Save $10 with Special Offer Code: ARCIFORM
Buy Tickets for the April 30th Performance Here


Details: Clybourne Park explores the transition of one home in a Chicago neighborhood from a middle-class suburban structure in 1959 to a dilapidated urban building in 2009. It’s new owners just want to tear it down and start over. But should it be preserved?

On April 30 join experts in the field of historical preservation, who’ll share their thoughts about the house in Clybourne Park.  Panelists include Peggy Moretti, Executive Director of the Historical Preservation League of Oregon; Cathy Galbraith, Executive Director of the Architectural Heritage Center; and Richard De Wolf, HPLO board member and owner of Arciform.

We hope you will join us for this fascinating performance and discussion.

Click here to purchase your tickets online and don’t forget to use the code “ARCIFORM” to save $10 off per ticket!

We look forward to hearing  your thoughts after the show!