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Posts from the ‘Kitchens’ Category

Inspired by the Story: An Interview with Anne De Wolf and the Kitzis-Strasfeld Family


“Designed by Portland’s most renowned architect, A.E. Doyle, this home creates a harmonious marriage of the grand and majestic spaces found in palatial mansions with the warmth and ease of lifestyle prevalent in the Craftsman cottage.” – Dan Volkmer

Moving from their beloved Victorian home in Goose Hollow, Lynne, Alex and their two children, Margot and Anderson, have lived in their current home for over 3 years now. After being referred by Dan Volkmer to Anne De Wolf as a talented designer who specializes in historic remodels, they began a whole-house remodel with Arciform.

“What we liked most about Anne was she knew her stuff when it came to historic home restoration, but she also had a funky flair about her designs,” says Alex as I step into the gorgeous home built in 1909 by local architect A.E. Doyle. Doyle also designed the Multnomah County Central Library, the Meier & Frank Building and the famous Benson Bubblers!

I notice wallpapers that are a clear trademark of Anne’s style and relish in the light, fun and sophisticated feel the Kitzis-Strasfeld home emanates.

This striking L’Oiseau Moderne wallpaper epitomizes the most exuberant Deco style that was popular between 1925-1930. “When done right, historic preservation is never boring,” says Anne.

Lynne Strasfeld and Alex Kitzis are doctors. They’re used to chaos and high stress situations. I keep this in mind when they tell me they chose to live in the home throughout the remodel.

“Living in the home during construction allowed us to be a part of the process, and we were able to make on-the-fly decisions and adjustments to the remodel plan,” Lynne tells me.

“Things like adding a counter below the microwave in the kitchen and replacing the mudroom were decided in-the-moment,” says Alex.


The original mudroom was rebuilt as part of the addition with, tile flooring and walls and built-ins. “The home has many small efficient spaces coupled with large public rooms,” says Anne

“And best of all, Jamie and Adam [Arciform’s lead carpenter and project manager on the project] were always respectful of our space; in the end they became like family,” Lynne says

Two weeks ago I was here getting photos of the home for both Arciform and interior designer Jenna Sheingold. During the photoshoot I played ping-pong in the fully finished basement with 9-year-old son Anderson – he shamelessly beat me five times in a row.

12-year-old Margot showed me her beautiful bedroom. I notice the light sea green ceiling (painted in Benjamin Moore’s Neon Celery) and the attached bathroom with beautiful details like classic white hexagonal tiles with black accents on the floor, the Carrara marble shower threshold and pretty wall-mounted sink by Duravit. The walls have been painted in Ice Blue by Benjamin Moore.

“I like how light and bright my room is,” says Margot.

Today I’m at the home with the Lynne, Alex, Anne, photographer Christopher Dibble and their cheerful golden retriever, Sadie. We’re getting a few more photos, and I’m learning more about the remodel. Anne brought pastries from Ken’s Artisan Bakery and we sit down to enjoy them in the garden room and chat more about the home.


What I love most about these interviews is hearing Anne talk about historical architecture. First of all, she has a charming German accent. Second, she knows her stuff and is passionate about design.

The remodel included expanding along one wall of the kitchen by three feet, removing a wall from the dining area to the living area, adding a new family room and bathroom to the basement and restoring historical details such as the oak hardwood flooring, large, west-facing windows and the pass-through butler’s pantry, among other things.

“The Kitzis-Strasfelds loved their previous home as well. They moved from an old Victorian just ½ mile from their new house. They were especially fond of their former kitchen with its cozy nook, so we took those elements and carried them into their new home. We expanded the kitchen, added wainscoting and banquette seating to the existing nook and used the same paint color—Gaelic Garden by Columbia Paints,” says Anne.


The existing kitchen with butler’s pantry has been updated to modern standards while respecting the vintage of the home

As we exit the house through the cheery red front door, Lynne tells me, “we had many happy hours sitting in our old kitchen, and now we feel the same about our new kitchen.”

This house is on the Ainsworth Holiday Home Tour which happens this Thursday, 11/30! Be sure to check it out.

Written by Snow Blackwood

Photo Gallery (photos by Christopher Dibble):


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Adventures in Remodeling, Part 3: The Kitchen

If you imagine your ideal kitchen, do you dream of a spacious room connected to the outdoors through a sunny breezeway that provides lots of storage?


In this 3rd chapter about our 1920 bungalow project, Arciform’s lead carpenters Jamie Whittaker & Eric Delph share stories about the kitchen addition, with all of its special touches.

Jamie tell us that this kitchen is the hub & heart of the home, a space for living & creating. It’s full of ideas from the whole team that became reality, but not without challenges.

Some of his favorite features: the two beautiful dutch doors, one leading to the new covered back porch & the other to the the side yard.


The custom kitchen table, which provides space for eating or lounging while watching a TV that can be concealed behind a drop-down panel in the wall.

Another favorite piece is the fridge. It started as a big, modern appliance & we “dressed it up” like a vintage cooler you might see in an old general store.

The spacious salvaged island provides plenty of room for family time, & the built-in storage has a pressed tin door panel to resemble a pie safe.

Eric lists the 1929 Magic Chef range as a gem. Our client bought it online from some distant state & had the seller store it while we remodeled. When our client called for delivery, he learned that the seller had passed away & the range could not be found! Our client had to fly someone down to find it & bring it home.

He also lists the large vintage sink as a favorite element, with its built-in double drainboards and legs.

We turned the original kitchen into a little walk-through library

Jamie installing the cabinetry in the breezeway

& PM Adam enjoying a hard day at work

Arciform & Versatile Wood Products Teams on this project included:

  • Brad Horne, senior drafter, responsible for documentation & working with the city of Lake Oswego. We could not have done this without him.
  • Marty Hegg did all the fixture & finish specifications.
  • Principal Designer Anne De Wolf worked closely with the creative clients.
  • PM Adam Schoeffel led the construction team, helped with detail development & found treasures like the kitchen island.
  • Devin Morrow assisted with project logistics.
  • Dave Thomas managed deconstruction, salvaged material organization & labeling, which was crucial.
  • Eric Delph was our primary site lead! Among many contributions he personally co-designed (with the client) & constructed the garage storage & its icebox doors, & kept the crew on track.
  • Jamie Whittaker was our co-site lead, chief of special projects & master of craftsmanship.
  • David Gamble built the cabinetry, walnut kitchen table & worked on the salvaged table & fridge panels.
  • Dan Brindusesc & Eric Voss built the exterior doors & did sash work on the stained glass windows.
  • Rene Flannigan & Brent Dickey did all specialty finishes on the salvaged table, wine cellar door & panels in the garage.

Thanks to our wonderful, creative & inspiring clients, we were all able to do what we love to do!

If you missed part 1 or 2 of this series, check them out here.

Professional photos by Photo Art Portraits & Blankeye.






An Atlanta Arciform Project

What do you do when you’ve just started to enjoy your dream whole house renovation only to land a job that has you moving across the country?

For one Arciform client the answer was simple. Have Arciform Principal Designer Anne De Wolf adapt their favorite design elements from their Portland home to work in their new Atlanta home.

Here’s a look at how it all turned out.


The clients loved their Arciform kitchen, with its classic grey, black and white color palette, custom island,  and pendant chandeliers. Designed by Arciform Principal Designer Anne De Wolf.


The new kitchen features an island with similar design details and cabinetry that matches the millwork details of the original design. A glint of brass in the pendant lighting fixtures and cabinetry hardware gives a touch of Atlanta luxe to the revised design.

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The white on white palette is warmed up with brass hardware accents. Below, a full wall of cabinetry with glass multi-lite doors offers display space for favorite serving pieces. The fridge blends into the cabinetry behind integrated panels.

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In the master bath, Arciform’s Portland project (below) featured a walk-in marble lined shower with  dual shower heads and a bench seating. The custom vanity featured marble counters and old Hollywood inspired design details.


The Atlanta version of the project brings the same classic elegance and custom vanity details to the project. The more generous square footage of the new Atlanta master bath (below) allows the walk in shower to be supplemented with a soaking tub.

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The rest of the home offered opportunities to play with the same classic color palette on a much larger canvas.

Here are some of the highlights:


The lines of the dramatic entry staircase are punctuated by a glossy black handrail.

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At the top of the stairs, an custom obscured glass skylight floods the  landing with natural light while adding depth and dimensionality to the space.

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Custom full height display cabinets in the dining room feature dramatic X-shaped muntins on the glass doors.

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Black, white and a glint of brass carry through every detail, even down to the under sink pipes in this WC.

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The living room features classic millwork accents that draw the eye upward towards luxuriously high ceilings.

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It was such a rare and enjoyable opportunity for us apply the Arciform design sensibility to a project in a different part of the country. It’s a useful reminder that, although you can’t take your Arciform kitchen with you, you can definitely recreate your favorite design details (with a little help from our design department).

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Kid-Friendly Kitchens

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Incorporating a space just for kids keeps them close-by during meal prep. Design by Principal Designer Anne De Wolf, photo by Patrick Weishampel.

In preparation for our Spring workshop we will share a few posts on kid-friendly spaces.
First up: kitchens. Here are a few things to keep in mind when designing your kid-friendly kitchen.


Caesarstone is a durable & kid-friendly countertop. Design by Principal Designer Anne De Wolf, photo by Photo Art Portraits.


The largest, most used areas of your kitchen are counters, floors, cabinets and appliances – choose finishes that are durable and easy to clean.

Your most durable countertop options are Quartz, Corian and Swanstone. They require little maintenance and largely resistant to staining, scratches and heat. Granite is another good option – when sealed properly your counters can be non-porous as well as heat-resistant.


Hardwood floors are warm and easy to maintain. Design by Senior Designer Kristyn Bester, photo by Photo Art Portraits.

When it comes to flooring options, selecting a hardwood or durable large-format ceramic/porcelain tile will serve you well. A wood floor is warm, can be refinished and is somewhat impact-resistant. Spills are easy to clean on a tile floor and typically won’t cause damage if left for a longer period of time.


Stainless steel appliances make the space shine. Design by Senior Designer Chelly Wentworth, photo by Photo Art Portraits.

Appliances take up a large amount of surface space in your kitchen, so consider the finish you select. Stainless steel looks great but will show hand prints and smudges. There are a few stainless steel finish options that resist marks more than others – Frigidaire’s “Smudge Proof” for example. You could also invest in a good cleaning product that will make removing smudges effortless.

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Pullout drawers allow for easy access to all of your pantry items. Design by Senior Designer Kristyn Bester, photo by Photo Art Portraits.


Having a pantry that is kid-accessible will make it easier for your little ones to be self-sufficient and will provide ample storage. By adding pullout drawers, everything will be at eye-level.


This open-plan kitchen is not only great for entertaining, it keeps your family close by as well. Design by Principal Designer Anne De Wolf, photo by Photo Art Portraits.


Create an open-plan kitchen to encourage your children to do their homework nearby while you cook or help out in the kitchen during meal prep. By incorporating an eating space at an island or nearby nook, the kids can be nearby during snack times.


A nook off the kitchen is a great place for family meals or games – don’t forget to incorporate a place for your furry friend! Design by Principal Designer Anne De Wolf, photo by Photo Art Portraits.


Nooks serve well as a family eating space or spot for homework, games or crafts. Think about incorporating a space for your furry friends too that will keep them close but not too close during meals.

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A large island is a great place for snack time and for kids to do homework or crafts. Design by Senior Designer Kristyn Bester, photo by Photo Art Portraits.


If you spend a lot of time in your kitchen and like to involve your kids, think about lowering the island countertop to make it kid-accessible. Islands also serve as a great place for eating/snack time, homework, crafts and games. If you are pinched for space, rolling carts can serve as islands that easily stow out of the way. Consider collapsible or retractable counters – these are perfect for snack areas or work stations.


Microwave drawers in the island allow kids to heat up their own snacks. Design by Senior Designer Chelly Wentworth, photo by Photo Art Portraits.

Refrigerator &  Microwave Drawers

Refrigerator and microwave drawers can be placed below countertop level which gives kids easy access. Refrigerator drawers are a great place to keep healthy snacks and drinks.

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A designated drawer for pet food keeps it out of the way but easily accessible. Design by Principal Designer Anne De Wolf, photo by Patrick Weishampel.


Are your pets your babies? Consider built-in storage for food and water bowls and other fun ways to incorporate them into your space.

These are just a few considerations when designing a kid-friendly space. Ready to learn more? Join us on May 18th for our Designed for Your Growing Family Workshop – find the details and RSVP here.

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Your Whole House Plan Part Two: A Plan for Every Floor

In the second part of our series on the whole house plan, we’ll share some step by step ideas and best practices for your internal renovation plan.


This adventurous Victorian in Sellwood added clever features to each floor that were designed to inspire exploration, discovery and play. Designed by Arciform Principal Designer Anne De Wolf. Photo by Photo Art Portraits.

Start at the Top

As much as you may have been dying to tackle that kitchen renovation first, we usually recommend that you plan your renovations from the top down, starting with the roof (including dormer additions) and working your way to the basement.

This helps ensure that any new electric, plumbing or structural changes that may affect the lower floors will happen before you’ve done all the beautiful finish work on those floors.

Dormer Details

When developing your dormer design, you’ll want to weigh the interior practicalities (headroom, floor space) against the exterior aesthetics. Adding a dormer dramatically changes the look of your home and you’ll want to consider how the design looks from all angles to ensure a cohesive result.


This shed dormer designed by Arciform Principal Designer Anne De Wolf continues the long, low lines of the house’s Mid-Century architecture and features a dramatic eight sash casement window custom built by Versatile Wood Products.

While developing the design for the exterior of your dormer, you will also want to ask:

  • How will rainwater be managed on the newly-proposed roofline?
  • Will the new siding, windows and roof elements be accessible and easy to maintain?

Building out a dormer is also a great time to consider insulating your attic crawlspaces to ensure that any new heating routed to the newly-finished rooms will function at peak efficiency.

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This master bath dormer addition tucks dual sinks and a luxurious walk in shower into a compact shed dormer footprint. Extra-deep medicine cabinets offer elegant, out-of-site storage for all the bathroom sundries. Designed by Arciform Senior Designer Chelly Wentworth. Photo by Photo Art Portraits.

The most common reason for a dormer addition is to add a bathroom upstairs. If a bath is on your wish list, your designer will consider:

  • Where is the existing main floor bathroom in relationship to the new proposed bath?
    Typically it will be less expensive to site a new bathroom above an existing bathroom to take advantage of the main plumbing stack.
  • Which direction do your floor joists run to prevent issues with the routing of the drain lines?
    Are they sized to support the increased weight of your proposed rooms and will the drain lines fit within the cavity?
    It’s worth opening a hole in the ceiling to take a look at your joists early in the design process since the size and direction of your joists will have a large impact on your project’s feasibility and cost.

Mastering the Main Floor

Modern preferences tend toward a more open floor plan for the main floor; removing walls and eliminating formal dining spaces is a common request.


The central focus of this Mid-Century Modern whole house renovation was the creation of an open plan living, dining and kitchen area that made the most of the gorgeous views of Mt Hood in the home’s wraparound picture windows. Designed by Arciform Principal Designer Anne De Wolf. Photo by Photo Art Portraits.

Your designer will help you identify which walls in your home might be the best candidates for opening up the space and will help navigate potential structural reinforcements to the home that may become necessary.

Cost vs. Value

We typically recommend that you invest first in the main floor project that will have the largest positive impact on your home’s future value. This is usually the kitchen or a master suite bathroom.

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This kitchen renovation mixes an on-trend color palette with classic elements like subway tile and Carrara marble to create a timeless update that will improve the home’s value for decades to come. Designed by Arciform Senior Designer Kristyn Bester. Photo by Photo Art Portraits.

Little Spaces, Big Impact

While you are planning your main floor, don’t forget the little spaces that can have a big impact on your guests’ comfort.


It may be a small space, but your powder room can offer the opportunity for a big design statement. This powder room (above) features a bold pop of color and a fun twist with a wallpaper called “Brooklyn Toile” designed by Mike Diamond of the Beastie Boys. Designed by Arciform Senior Designer Chelly Wentworth. Photo by Photo Art Portraits.


    • Should you add or update a powder room for guests?
    • How will you tackle your mudroom needs?

Whether you design a full mudroom addition like the one below or simply designate an area adjacent to the back door, you’ll want to consider how the essential functions of capturing coats, keys, shoes and other items will be handled in your master plan.


This mudroom addition to a Sellwood Victorian includes secret pass through doors to load athletic equipment through and an unusual ceiling assembled from salvage cabinet doors.
Designed by Arciform Principal Designer Anne De Wolf. Photo by Photo Art Portraits.


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This entry area tucks away mudroom storage behind a set of stylish built-ins beneath the stairs. A bench seat offers a handy spot for shedding rain boots and packages on the way in the door.
Designed by Arciform Principal Designer Anne De Wolf. Photo by Patrick Weishampel/BLANKEYE.

Next on the renovation list should be the basement. Whether you are building in an investment opportunity with an ADU or giving the kids room to spread out, the basement should be the last room on your to-do list.

Such a flexible and complicated space is worthy of its own post, so look to Part Three for details on making the most of your basement renovation.

Part Three: The Basement and Beyond

Previous Post: A Solid Foundation

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Thriving During the Remodel

You’ve been waiting for this day for months – construction is starting! While exciting, remodels can also be daunting, especially if you are losing the functionality of your kitchen or bathroom for a few weeks. Here are some tips from our design team on how to cope.

Depending on the scope of the project, some clients consider renting temporary accommodation (be sure to include this in your remodeling budget!), staying with family or “roughing it” for the duration of construction.

If you’ve decided to “rough it” and stay in your home, consider the following:

  • Temporary kitchen
  • Temporary bathing facility
  • Storage
  • Kids
  • Pets


temp kitchen

Temporary Kitchen

Consider setting up a temporary, minimalist kitchen. Keep the essentials close by – fridge, coffee maker, toaster and/or toaster oven, microwave, induction hot plate, utensils. Plan for quick and easy meals that can be prepared in a toaster oven or microwave. If the weather permits, utilize your grill or camping stove. Think about cooking and freezing food that will make your life easier – sauces or stews that you can easily add a grain or vegetable to. Also consider washing facilities – outdoor sink, bathroom sink or bathtub.



Temporary Bathroom

If you are remodeling multiple bathrooms, phase them if possible. This may mean sharing one bathroom with your family, but it’s better than the alternative of none. If you only have one bath, think about where you will shower – neighbor, gym, office. At the very least, we are often able to leave the toilet functioning.




Moving and remodeling are two of the best times to purge – haven’t used that thing you don’t recognize in a while? Get rid of it! Other options are offsite storage units, PODs or moving items into unaffected rooms.


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This is perhaps one of the biggest considerations when planning your remodel. Not only do we take steps to ensure the safety of your family – lead safe practices, zipper walls and partitioning parts of the house – we will work with you to discover your families’ needs and do our best to minimize additional disruption. Some clients choose to start the construction phase during summer holidays – this is a good option especially if you are able to go on vacation(s) and it makes cooking outdoors much easier. Upside: most kids are resilient and enjoy the process with all of the trucks and tools!



Some pets may require daycare due to noise and others may just need to be kept in a separate part of the house.

The Emotional Rollercoaster

emotional rollercoaster

This is an image we often refer to in our office. David Lupberger argues there is a psychological connection between home and self that accounts for the intense feelings many homeowners experience.

A home, he says, is often a reflection, or an extension, of who the homeowners perceive themselves to be. A place of self-expression, contains our most cherished memories, it’s a safe place where we can feel nurtured and let down our guard. So it’s understandable why a remodeling project feels disruptive to clients. When clients have to move out of a kitchen, or shroud half their house in plastic, it feels like an invasion of their most personal space, Lupberger says.

How did you survive, and thrive during your remodel? Share your tips and advice in the comments.

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Your Whole House Plan Part One: A Solid Foundation

You may only be thinking about a quick update to your master bath or basement right now. But have you considered how the choices you are making on this remodel will affect the future plans you may have for your house?


Creating a whole house plan will ensure that each step you take to improve your home will be thoughtfully considered and efficiently executed with the needs of future projects in mind. This will save time, prevent costly re-dos and offer the peace of mind that each improvement you make will dovetail seamlessly with the projects before and after it.

In this three part series, we’ll break it down step by step to offer which questions to consider and which best practices to keep in mind for each phase of your plan to ensure a result you’ll be happy with for the lifetime of your home.

Part One: Creating a Solid Foundation for your Whole House Plan

1. Identify Your Goals

Before you spend any money on your home, it will be important to consider carefully the following questions:

  • Which investment will be right for your home based on its current value?
  • How does your plan fit in with the style and scope of homes in your neighborhood?
  • Which kinds of improvements are most appropriate for your stage of life and the life cycle of your family? Some remodeling projects recoup nearly 100% of their cost in increased home value- others may not but may be worth the investment for other reasons.

You’ll also need to keep both your family’s long term and short term needs in mind.

  • How will your family’s needs change over the time you plan to be in your home?
  • Will you need to accommodate an aging parent?
  • Make room for your family to grow?
  • Prepare for an empty nest?

2. Assemble Your Team

Assembling the team of professionals you’d like to work with at the beginning will ensure clear communication and avoid unnecessary overlap or conflict between the responsibilities of each professional.


At minimum, you’ll want to identify your:

        • Architectural Design Team
        • Construction Team
        • Interior Decorator
        • Landscape Architect

Keep in mind that each of these teams will have existing relationships with city officials and subcontractors who will also end up being an important part of the decision making process as you develop your plan.

As a design|build company, Arciform offers an integrated design and construction team that will stay with you every step of the way and coordinate all of the other professionals you will need to complete your projects.

3. Develop Your Design

Your whole house design will take into consideration any engineering, systems upgrades (like new heating or electrical) and structural changes required to meet your long term goals.


It will also develop the design details for each proposed project so that they will fit the architectural style of your home while showcasing your family’s unique tastes and personality. Along the way your design team will help you consider the following questions:

  • Which layout changes will make your home function better?
  • What storage needs do you have?
  • Which appliance or technology upgrades are you hoping to incorporate?
  • Which architectural details will integrate well with your home’s era and style?
  • What mood and design aesthetic would you like the finished spaces to evoke?
  • Which colors, shapes, textures and design details would you like to see integrated into the finished project? Every detail of your proposed project that can be selected in advance will save costly delays and change orders later.

4. Deal with the Foundation First

If your goals include updating the seismic bracing, mitigating water infiltration or expanding the head height in your basement, these are all projects that should be tackled prior to any interior renovations. This includes digging out your foundation or lifting your house if necessary.


Getting your basement completely dry will often also require a look at your rooftop water management systems, your landscaping plan (to be sure water is being directed away from your foundation with appropriate grading) and may include the installation of underground french drains to route groundwater around and away from your home.

5. Update your Mechanical Systems

Are new furnace or heating systems part of the long term plan for your home?

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As un-sexy as these basic mechanical upgrades can be, they can make a huge difference to your comfort in the home. They also require ripping into walls, usually on multiple floors, so it is best to take care of them early before you start any internal renovation projects.

The last thing you want to do is tear into your beautiful new paint job to arrange the installation of a  heating duct.

6. Button Up Your Envelope

After your mechanical systems are updated, its time to consider what energy performance upgrades might be needed in your home.


Sealing the cracks and air holes that create drafts, adding insulation and installing new windows and doors can all happen prior to any internal renovations.

Thayer Perspective

Next Step: The Fun Part! Planning your Interior Renovations

In the next installment we’ll take it floor by floor to offer insight into which projects to tackle first and what questions to ask as you design your dream kitchen, master suite and basement.

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Which Counter Top Material is Right for You?

Yoo_1914_Kitchen_A_P_Pro_ (7)A richly veined granite counter top adds great texture to this classic kitchen… but it requires a regular maintenance schedule to stay looking beautiful. Project designed by Kristyn Bester.

Are you easygoing but stylish? Glamorous but fussy? Rough and tumble and ready to rumble? Your family’s personality has a huge impact on which counter top material will be right for your kitchen.

Schaefer_1937_Kitchen_A_1_P (3)This unusual Icestone counter has beautiful little flecks of pearlescent shell and glass embedded in it. Project designed by Anne De Wolf.

With so many choices out there it can be hard to pin down what’s right for you.

Guitteau_1929_Kitchen_A_7_P_ProThis soapstone counter will develop a beautiful natural patina but needs to be oiled routinely to keep it looking its best. Project designed by Anne De Wolf.

Fortunately, we ran across this nifty quiz on Houzz that does a pretty great job of helping you identify the counter material that will be a perfect fit.

NeelyDonoher_1904_Kitchen_A_P_Pro_ (2)The thin, stainless steel counters on this breakfast nook are great for busy families: indestructible but still so stylish.

Take the quiz here and then let us know what your results were in the comments below!

Runyon_1928_Kitchen_A_P_Pro_ (13)This Caesarstone counter provides a crisp white counterpoint to the stylish black millwork on the windows.

For more design inspiration, feel free to join us at our Kitchens that Work Design Workshop  on Wednesday, May 27th. Get the details and RSVP here.

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Knife Storage Solutions


We asked our Junior Designers for some of their favorite knife storage solutions. Read on to find out what Bianca and Kat have been seeing lately…

Bianca says…

This is the knife block that I have at home. I absolutely love it because it’s a beautiful way to display my knives and very easy to access.

west elm knife block

Kat and Bianca agree…

The best knife storage solutions are easily accessible in a prep area but are still out of the way of little hands. The drawer insert is probably one of the best options and would also age appropriately with the home. They keep countertop clutter to a minimum and protect the knives, too. You can have drawer inserts custom-created to fit into a very shallow top drawer for flat things like spatulas, etc. Knife drawer

Because Bianca is a sucker for unique design, she loves these options…

wrench knife

saddle knife

Kat says…

Another popular option for very busy chefs who prefer to have everything in-sight and readily accessible is a magnetic knife board. Easy to grab what you need, easy to put it back after washing.

Magnet Knife Rack

Other unique options we’ve been seeing…

6 kitchen storage trends - pullout knife drawer


Looking for more design inspiration for your kitchen? Join us for our Kitchens that Work Design Workshop on May 18th. Get the details and RSVP here by May 15th to attend FREE.

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A Backsplash with Personality

A backsplash is a great place to showcase your personality in the kitchen. Whether you are looking for a simple solution with a pop of color or a unique modern twist, there are endless options to choose from.

Add extra convenience with a niche at your range to store spices and oils or a special curio.

Spice up your niche with a fun Arabesque tile.

What better place to put a special curio that makes you smile.

Add a pop of color!

These homeowners added some pizazz to their kitchen by selecting a colorful glass tile.

Add some pizzazz to a classic kitchen by selecting a colorful, yet subtle glass tile.

Ocean lover? Bring the sea to your kitchen with a multicolored glass tile.

Are you a salvage king or queen? Show off some of your treasures!

This tile was salvaged from the original 1913 kitchen and found a home above the range in the updated one!

Maybe classic is your thing. Try breaking up a simple subway tile with a unique piece that adds an extra touch of sophistication.

Break up the subway tile and showcase a gorgeous handmade tile.

What about an option that looks more like art?

Go with a large format tile that looks like wallpaper.

Looking for a modern twist that’s easy to maintain?

This modern kitchen kicked it up with a stainless steel backsplash to compliment their stainless steel cabinets.

This client kicked it up with a stainless steel backsplash to complement their stainless steel cabinets and range.

There are so many ways to give your backsplash personality, while respecting the era of your home. Let us help you find your perfect fit.

Looking for more design inspiration for your kitchen? Join us for our Kitchens that Work Design Workshop on May 18th. Get the details and RSVP here by May 15th to attend FREE.

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