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Posts from the ‘Client’s Eye View’ Category

Client’s Eye View: Donna and Bill’s Compact and Classic Kitchen

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Reversing the damage of a poorly considered ’80s remodel and packing a compact kitchen with storage without making the space feel cluttered were two important goals of this recently completed Arciform kitchen remodel. But don’t take our word for it. We recently interviewed the homeowners to get a “client’s eye view” of their kitchen renovation experience.

What were your goals for this renovation?

We had several goals. All were equally important to us. We badly needed an update of the large appliances. There were electrical needs. We had only 3 outlets and two overhead lights – one over the sink and one in the center of the room. The room looked like Macy’s kitchen department. With no storage for small appliances, the counter space was used for  the toaster, the mixer, and so on. My spices were stored in 3 different places. We needed more counter space. The house was built in 1916, so we wanted the design to reflect the look of the rest of the house.

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Here’s a peek at the kitchen before the remodel.

What were your concerns going into the remodeling process?

We chose Arciform after some thoughtful research.  We hoped Arciform COULD DELIVER. We loved their ideas and their willingness to partner with us to make the kitchen happen. They did deliver.

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 What did you learn during the process?

The design is the key. Arciform worked with us to design every inch of the project. We revisited the design over and over. Arciform made what WE wanted and needed an essential part of the design process. As the design evolved, we learned about materials, costs and even construction.

What are your favorite elements of the completed kitchen and why?

I LOVE how it reflects the period in which the house was built.  This makes it a better house.

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The lighting is great!  I can see when I cook. I have counter lighting as well as 4 ceiling lights.

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Using small appliances isn’t a task anymore.  There are outlets everywhere.

 

My spices are all in one drawer and easy to see.

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Because  I have an appliance barn, the Macy kitchen department look is gone, and I have lots more counter space.

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The large appliances are “state of the art.”  They are more efficient, more quiet, more dependable and really fun to use.

 Tell us about your experience of working with Arciform.

Our working relationship with Arciform was great. From the estimate to the finished job, there were no surprises.  I think their strong suit is communication.  They stayed in touch by text and email, informing us of even small changes in the schedule.  All the personnel are excellent people – smart, thoughtful and skilled.  The workers all cleaned up after themselves.

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It was a pleasure to help Donna & Bill get the kitchen they’ve always wanted. How can we help you meet your goals for your home? Get more details about our process and schedule a design consultation here.

Looking for more design inspiration for your kitchen? Join us for our Kitchens that Work Design Workshop on May 18th. Get the details and RSVP here by May 15th to attend FREE.

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Client’s Eye View: Laurelhurst Cottage Remodel

We’re just breaking ground on a renovation of a 1928 Tudor cottage in Laurelhurst and delighted to discover that our clients have decided to start a blog to track their renovation experience from start to finish.

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How fun!

Check out their  first post here.  We’ll follow along from our blog as well. Here’s a few favorite tidbits from her first post:

In late October 2013 we purchased & moved into our home in the historic Laurelhurst neighborhood of Portland, OR.  Within the first week of moving in we met and started our journey with the talented peoples at Arciform to transform the outdated and dysfunctional kitchen and master bathroom into something great!

Day 3:
“Blue skies all around me, nothing but blue skies do i see…”  or it could just be a blue tarp covering the kitchen window.
JACKHAMMERING…
(do I need to say any more about that???)
to lay the foundation for the “nook” addition and the new slope of stairs from the main floor to the basement the existing concrete pad for the mud room was removed.

We can’t wait to see how it all comes together. Will you take the journey with us?

Client’s Eye View: 2 Baths with Room to Breathe

HirschShimizu_1926_Bathrm1_A_1_P_Pro (26)Designed by Anne De Wolf. Photo by Photo Art Portraits.

We recently completed a matching pair of upstairs bathroom renovations for a NW Portland client who needed a little elbow room in a fairly small footprint. Here’s her “client’s eye view” of how it all came out.

1.       What were your goals with this bathroom renovation?

We needed to update both baths. The shower bath especially needed a larger showering area and both baths needed updated electrical and plumbing, not to mention a new look. We also had a large Turkish-style tile arrangement that we wanted to incorporate into a wall of the new shower.

(Here’s a look at the shower before the renovation. With a glass door that swung into the shower alcove you can see it was quite a tight fit!)

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2.       What were some of the challenges the project faced and how did you address them?

The biggest challenge was enlarging the shower area without knocking out all the nearby upstairs walls and re-doing the much of the upstairs. This was achieved by much careful measuring and communicating within the design and project implementation team. In addition to Anne, [Project Manager] Adam made sure the plumber, electrician and inspector made it work. Because of the tight space, lovely and suitable sinks and light fixtures were found. Also new cabinetry was specially designed to work effectively with existing built-ins.

HirschShimizu_1926_Bathrm1_A_1_P_Pro (22)Designed by Anne De Wolf. Photo by Photo Art Portraits.

Here’s a look at the fixtures in Bathroom #1.

HirschShimizu_1926_Bathrm2_A_12_P_ProDesigned by Anne De Wolf. Photos by Photo Art Portraits.

And bathroom #2…

3.       What is your favorite part of the completed bathrooms?

It’s a pleasure to get clean again in simple but elegant surroundings. Showering in the open and lighter shower area feels great. The more sublime soaking experience in the tub speaks for itself. Both bathrooms offer privacy and yet feel more spacious than before.

HirschShimizu_1926_Bathrm2_A_1_P_ProDesigned by Anne De Wolf. Photos by Photo Art Portraits.

4.       Tell us about your experience of working with Arciform.

Mostly gush, gush, gush!

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Client’s Eye View: An Elegant, Whimsical Kitchen

parisstan-s-1937-kitchen-ba1-aDesign by Anne De Wolf. Photos by Photo Art Portraits.

For Paris and Stan, their kitchen renovation was all about adding joy and a touch of elegant whimsy to a hard-working space that needed to serve as kitchen, mudroom, pantry, office and family gathering hub.

Here’s where they began:

parisstan-s-1937-kitchen-ba1-bBefore the remodel.

Dated fixtures and finishes and a cramped footprint made this kitchen an unwelcoming and inconvenient space in the heart of their home.

Here’s Paris and Stan’s take on the project goals and challenges and how it all came out:

parisstan-s-1937-kitchen-a-4Design by Anne De Wolf. Photos by Photo Art Portraits.

Arciform: What were your goals with this kitchen remodel?

We wanted something special, not run-of-the-mill, that would reflect our family’s personality. We also wanted each family member to have their own cubby to store their gear and we wanted the space to be a welcoming hangout for the family to share “family time” together.

Arciform designer Anne De Wolf adds, “The project needed to integrate several overlapping uses into one cohesive space. We focused on efficient solutions for integrated storage and elegant but whimsical finishes that would add color and a light and airy feel to the space.”

Pendant lights selected after much searching add a touch of whimsy to the space, while ice stone counters with embedded flecks of glass and mother of pearl create a sense of luxury and surprise. Turquoise diamond-shaped glass tile add color and texture.

parisstan-s-1937-kitchen-a-3 Design by Anne De Wolf. Photos by Photo Art Portraits.

Arciform: What were some of the challenges the project faced and  how did you address them?

The space was small and dark and right in the central pathway of the home.

We chose reflective surfaces like stainless steel and light gloss upper cabinet finishes to capture as much light as possible. Full height cabinets make the most of every available inch of storage. The lower cabinets also have additional built-in storage solutions, including access to the storage space from both sides of the breakfast bar.

parisstan-s-1937-kitchen-a-1Design by Anne De Wolf. Photos by Photo Art Portraits.

Arciform: What’s your favorite part of the completed design?

We love everything. The textures make us happy, from the warm grain of the walnut lower cabinets to the diamond shaped glass tile backsplash and the glass knobs on the cabinet doors.

Family time is important to us, so we love the nook and the large breakfast counter. Our daughter can sit and clean her aquarium while we’re prepping dinner or finishing up work from the office.

parisstan-s-1937-kitchen-a-8Design by Anne De Wolf. Photos by Photo Art Portraits.

Arciform: Tell us about the experience of working with Arciform.

Anne kept saying it would look great. We were skeptical at first but we love it now. We’re really happy we went this direction.

parisstan-s-1937-kitchen-a-6Design by Anne De Wolf. Photos by Photo Art Portraits.

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Small Kitchen Makeover: Design Phase

How does a designer take a bundle of hopes, wishes, obstacles and opportunities and turn it into a coherent plan that will accomplish both the desires of the client and the practical needs of the project?

CURRENT PERSPECTIVES

For our small kitchen makeover winners, Arciform designer Chelly Wentworth developed her initial design proposal with 3 key goals in mind:

1. Open the kitchen up to the dining room to make the space feel larger.

2. Add storage wherever possible.

3. Integrate the clients’ preference for clean, modern lines with the vintage character of the home to create a timeless look.

CURRENT PLAN

To accomplish that goal, she began by creating a detailed plan of the existing kitchen (see above) to help visualize the challenges and options available in the space.

She also created a Pinterest board of style ideas to help illustrate and guide the design process.

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(Carrara marble and white subway tile are combined with open shelving in this sample kitchen pinned by Chelly. The result is a crisp neutral palette that still has vintage character and adds storage space without the bulk and expense of upper cabinets.)

From here, Chelly created a set of elevations (drawings that illustrate the kitchen one wall at a time) of her proposed designs.

Here are a few of the design details Chelly incorporated into her initial design.

CURRENT ELEVATIONS

Illustration A. A mixed mosaic tile back splash in anthracite from Oregon Tile and Marble will cover the west wall, adding a subtle repeating pattern and cool grey tones to the kitchen.  An existing obsolete chimney will be removed from the NW corner, opening up wall space for open shelving to display and store needed kitchen items.

Here’s what the mixed mosaic tile will look like:

Backsplash tileTo coordinate with the backsplash, George Morlan is providing a charcoal grey undermount sink with a very cool faucet. Take a look:

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Illustration B. The existing wall separating the dining room and kitchen will be removed, to be replaced with a peninsula that will house a dual fuel slide-in range with a clear glass range hood provided by Standard TV and Appliance. The peninsula will include a small overhang for a breakfast bar on the dining room side. A pendant light from Schoolhouse Electric will create a visual connection between the kitchen and dining spaces and millwork for the opening surrounding the peninsula will be matched to the existing molding and built-ins in the dining room to create a cohesive look.

Here’s the sample range and hood options:

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Illustration C. The removal of the north wall will open up room for a shallow spice cabinet to the left of the basement stairs, adding needed storage while keeping the new open feel of the space. A set of Julia Child-inspired wall mounted pot racks will allow them to keep their pots and pans close to hand.

Here’s a sample pegboard pot rack that will inspire the finished pot wall:

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Illustration D. The south wall will be the primary place to add new cabinets. Chelly proposes Shaker-style full overlay cabinet doors and drawer fronts from Versatile Wood Products to add vintage character while keeping the lines clean and simple.

Here’s an example (on the right) of what Shaker-style full overlay cabinets look like:

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For Darrick and Monica, the butcher block counter shown above would be replaced with honed grey Carrara marble counters  that will be cut by Wall to Wall Stone Corp and installed by Classic Marmo.

CURRENT ELEVATIONS-2

In the pantry, an unusually narrow 33″ wide fridge has been found that will tuck into the small space and open freely.

BONUS! Darrick noticed that the back side of the pantry connects to an empty space below the stairs, allowing us to tuck the microwave into a built-in cavity that will add a lot of functionality without sacrificing any counter or shelf space.

So what do Darrick and Monica think of how the design is progressing so far?

Darrick writes,

“As far as the design so far- we were pretty much floored. You visualize some of the design concepts but seeing it in a 3-D rendering puts it in a completely different picture and makes it much more real.”

What changes are they considering to the initial design?

* changing the shelves colors to match the floors
* adding a wine fridge (because we oh so love wine)
* adding a trash compactor (to minimize on the mountain climbing for each trip to the trash can)
* taking out the door frame that leads into the fridge room (to make it much more open)

Darrick adds, “The experience so far has been great. It’s been a great learning experience as this is the first time we’ve gone through a remodel. We’re excited to keep forging forward and can’t wait for the great result.”

Check out the “before” pictures of our Small Kitchen project here.

Next week: Contract Revisions: The Devil in the Details

Follow the story with these additional Kitchen Makeover Posts:

Ready, Set, Launch!

Meet the Makeover Winners

Announcing the Winner

Makeover Contest Finalists

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Thanks again to our Small Kitchen Makeover Contest Partners:

Basic CMYK

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CZ Becker logo

George Morlan logo

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Schoolhouse Electric logo

Standard TV logo

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Client’s Eye View: Creating a Light and Airy Art Studio

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Recently, we checked in with Judy, a recent Arciform client, to see how she is settling in to the art studio we helped her to create above her garage.

Here’s her take on the project.

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Arciform asks: What were your goals for this project?

I had two primary goals; first, to bring light and air into the attic space (which was dark with no functioning windows) and, second, to enlarge the usable space. By creating a large dormer window, which allowed us to raise the ceiling height for the unusable part of the floor space (and increase its size) we effectively doubled the studio. Not only did we install the dormer, we replaced the two non-functioning windows and added three skylights. The studio feels like a tree house! It is a wonderful contrast to the shaded and quiet feel in the rest of the house.

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Arciform asks: What challenges did the project face?

The biggest challenge was how to raise part of the roof without messing up the lines of the house yet still provide enough interior space for one to walk around upright. It worked out well.

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Arciform asks: What is your favorite part of the completed project?

Actually, I have two “favorites.”

We designed a non-traditional dormer that allows windows to open in the same (rather than alternating) direction. Thus, rather than the windows blocking airflow, one can angle the windows to capture breezes and direct them into to studio. In addition, the windows are conceived as one continuous block of windows–without dividing elements–so that when they are open nothing blocks the air or view.

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We also designed a clever way to add usable vertical surfaces to a studio with virtually no wall space, Between the old and new parts of the studio are a row of wood columns (about 30″ apart) that support the roof. We created a series of removable panels that can be inserted between each pair of supports. One side of each panel is cork, the other is whiteboard.

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Arciform asks: Tell us about the experience of working with Arciform.

They were great. They quickly understood my intentions and solved the most critical problem, maintaining the roof line. My project manager worked out the details of the panel concept and “made it work.” The dormers are truly beautiful. Building them this way was a first for us all. It took work to get the details right–particularly because I also wanted screens!

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I appreciate Arciform’s creativity and willingness to work with me on whatever hair brained idea I have.

We loved working on this unique project with Judy and we look forward to seeing what intriguing artistic projects she creates in the space!

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Rescuing a 100 Year Old Wisteria

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Normally we work to conserve the integrity of 100 year old homes. In this case, we had a unique opportunity to restore the architecture holding up a rare and beautiful 100 year old wisteria vine, protecting this extraordinary plant and providing our client with a safe and beautiful space to enjoy the beautiful days ahead this summer.

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The challenges were obvious and many: This vine had twined around and through the pergola structure, making it extremely difficult to identify where the rotting and failing pergola wood stopped and the vine began. Arciform carpenters needed to find ways to gently remove the old wood and re-weave the new wood into the structure without compromising the support the wisteria needed.

Arciform client Janell Neulinger shares her “client’s eye view” of this unusual project here:

What were your goals for this project?

This wasn’t, as you know, a new construction project. The existing pergola was rotting and threatening to take down at least one of the hundred-year-old wisteria vines. My goal for the project was to replace the structure with a new design that is strong, durable, and architecturally compatible with the house.

What challenges did the project face?

The obvious challenge was supporting the plants and working in close quarters with them while dismantling the old structure and building the new.

What is your favorite part of the completed project?

I really like the way the new structure fits into the landscape. The heft and blunt corners match up really well with the house and the scale of these ancient vines. The dark color ties in with the fence and makes a nice contrasting background for the new growth.

 Tell us about the experience of working with Arciform:

Working with Arciform was painless and pleasant. The carpenters were very friendly and happy to answer questions. They seemed pretty jazzed at the “puzzle” of supporting the vines during demo and construction. It wasn’t easy for the guys to thread the rafters through the branches of the plants, but they managed to do it, cheerfully, and with minimal damage to the plant. The site was reliably tidy during and after each workday. We had a few schedule changes, but everything was promptly and effectively communicated.

We very much enjoyed working with you too, Janell!

As we enjoy this week of unexpectedly beautiful weather, what structures are you considering adding to your garden to make the most of the summer sunshine? A pergola can be a simple and beautiful way to add shade and create a home for your favorite climbing flowers and vegetables.

Want some more outdoor living inspiration? Join us for our Bringing the Inside Out Summer Home Design Workshop on June 13th. Get the details and RSVP here.

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Summertime in Oregon

If you’ve lived in Oregon for a while you are probably familiar with our summers. Or our lack of summers. I’m an accountant and a sun slut, so I’m a bit obsessed with when we get our first 80 degree day, if we hit 100, how many times we hit 100, etc. I may have made charts. It ain’t pretty.

Another Oregonian trait is wringing every last bit of summer out of our so-called summer. If it’s not raining too hard, we’re outside. Our patios get a serious workout, even if they’re covered with moss and mildew.

Here’s a question – do you stare out at your patio or deck all winter and imagine changes that would allow you to hang out there more?

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(Above are pics of Arciform owner Anne De Wolf enjoying two very different spaces last summer: a client’s deck and her own front porch.)

Maybe if you had a covered area and a fire pit, you would cook outside more?

The Oregonian just showed Toro Bravo chef John Gorham’s fire pit – and it’s not too involved. You could have one of these.

kitchen-group3jpg-f86501433d462433(Check out John Gorham’s indoor kitchen… and his outdoor one. Photo from the Oregonian by Wendi Nordeck.)

If you had an outdoor kitchen, you would be able to do your canning outside. Hmmm. Maybe you only need an outdoor sink? How about a greenhouse or a potting shed for garden starts? Better lighting to extend your time outside?

The list of possibilities is endless.

Re-vamping your outdoor space could be done more easily than you think. First, you can use salvaged products.

Salvaged bricks, pavers, concrete pieces and gravel can all be combined to make paths, patios and fire pits (check out this for inspiration). Mixed metal scrap (bought by the pound) can be used for fill, for pathways, for texture in a patio. An outdoor sink can be found at the ReBuilding center, Rejuvenation, on Craigslist. This one was sitting outside at Rejuvenation:

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You can cover the sink with an awning made of salvaged wood, and perhaps leftover roofing tile. Salvaged doors and windows can be used to make a potting shed, a greenhouse or part of your outdoor kitchen. Salvaged industrial grids are excellent for pathways in muddy areas – these grids are designed to minimize slipping. Filled with gravel they are a thing of beauty in a muddy area.

Also, an important point to remember with salvage is that availability is often more important than a preconceived idea.

If your neighbor is pulling up her concrete driveway, take the pieces. The universe might be telling you to have a broken concrete pathway. If someone has a pallet of bricks to give away or for sale at a good price, that’s the universe telling you to consider a brick fire pit or patio. I find the universe speaks to me a lot if pay attention to the words “free” or “cheap”. For example, the container below was sitting on a 500 square foot b-ball court. By cutting out concrete sections and filling them in with gravel, plus adding a step the length of the container (using leftover material), an ugly old piece of concrete became a nifty hang-out space.

(FYI – rounds of wood from cut branches or stumps would also make cool fill – see this pin)

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And then the cut-out concrete pieces were used to make a path to the sauna (excuse the yard – it has not yet been re-seeded):

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(Also note the metal grid pathway on the right in the above pic – this is great for muddy areas in the garden.)

How to start?

Easy – Arciform can help with every stage of your outdoor space. First, the designers (Kristyn and Anne) can take a look at what you have going on now and help you see what it could be. They can advise about what materials can be saved and reused versus scrapped. For example, this sauna structure was made from lumber salvaged from my ripped out deck. The roof was material left over from another Arciform project (thank you Arciform!)

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The designers will get you a set of plans. You can start shopping, and if that’s a hurdle for you, Arciform can also help you shop for new or salvaged goods. And then, of course, there are the guys – the wonderful Arciform crew that will make it all happen.

What do you think? Do you want to get started? Remember, getting started does not mean uprooting your yard this summer. If you want to, no worries. (I started with plans for a new deck last spring and it was my summer project.)

However, you can also start with the plans now, spend next winter gathering materials, and get that deck patio / deck / outdoor space done by summer of ’14. Just sayin’.

About Nancy Ranchel

Nancy is an accountant who offsets the practicality of her day job with extravagant and outrageous remodeling projects, often involving massive amounts of scrap metal.  In her free time she can be found dreaming up new ways to turn her house into an art installation, digging through scrap heaps, and contemplating a world without plastic. Check out Nancy’s blog here: www.replaceinpdx.com/

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Client’s Eye View: Restoring a Vintage Kitchen with a Touch of Tiffany Blue

Meet Marty and Matt, clients whose beautiful vintage kitchen renovation is featured on this year’s Architectural Heritage Center’s 2013 Kitchen Revival Tour.

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You can check out their kitchen on the Tour on April 13 (get your tickets here), but before you go, we thought you might enjoy Marty’s take on the goals and outcomes of her project, along with a few comments from project’s lead carpenter, Jeremy Gould, about some of the pleasures (and challenges) of a vintage kitchen restoration.

Arciform Asks: Marty, What were your goals for your kitchen renovation?

Stockton_1929_Kitchen_B_ (4)(Here’s a peek at the kitchen prior to the remodel.)

  • Installing a dishwasher (our first in 10 years)
  • Adding an island and increasing the work/counter space in the kitchen
  • Opening up the kitchen by eliminating the dark enclosed hallway, which led to the back door
  • Creating a space that would become the heart and activity center of the home
  • Maintaining the vintage charm, which was one of the reasons we fell in love with this house

Arciform Asks: What were your concerns going into the remodel process?

Simply living in a kitchen remodel, especially … with two young children and a dog.

This was not our first major remodel, but it was our first with kids. We addressed this by expanding the use of our laundry room to include a temporary kitchen by relocating the microwave, slow cooker, toaster and a small kitchenette set. All was very doable and kind of like inside camping.

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(Here is the kitchen renovation in progress. Hard to imagine where you could make a sandwich, isn’t it?)

Arciform Asks Lead Carpenter Jeremy Gould: This was a client who wanted to retain and enhance the vintage character of her kitchen.

What unique challenges does it pose to work in a kitchen where many elements are older/original?

One of my bigger challenges was removing the wall at the left hand side of the tile counter top without disturbing the tile backsplash which was on the wall. I had to work like a surgeon and gently remove small pieces of wall at a time to not crack the grout.

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Our other challenge was finding cabinet hinges that matched existing to install on our new cabinets so when looking at the kitchen you couldn’t tell where the old stopped and the new started.

Stockton_1929_Kitchen_B_ (17)(Here’s a close up of those original cabinet hinges.)

Arciform Asks Marty: What did you learn during the process?

We learned to take advantage of when the walls were open by adding structural supports for a future remodel phase and extending electrical work to a hallway niche for art. We also learned that there is an art to orchestrating all the tradesmen and subcontractors. Having an onsite carpenter is like having an extended family member and liaison to the project manager and rest of the team.

Arciform Asks Marty: What are your favorite elements of the completed kitchen and why?

The sheer amount of space is a luxury especially in an older home.

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The soft lighting options and the jellyfish etched on the light shades adds a touch of whimsy and speaks to our family’s interest in nature.

The “Tiffany blue” wall color is both calming and uplifting.

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Keeping the original tile around the sink is almost a match to the house I grew up in on NE 32nd Ave/NE Fremont just blocks away.

A bookcase built at the end of the island is perfect for my mom’s cookbooks.

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The reclaimed hardwoods are almost a match to the rest of the house.

Having a dishwasher!!!!

Arciform Asks: Tell us about the experience of working with Arciform.

Arciform to us is Anne, Richard, Marty, Adam and Jeremy, all professionals who advocated both for us and for the integrity of our home.

When we first met with Anne and Richard, they shared an immediate reaction to keeping the tile around the sink, and the cabinetry and its hardware. Working with Anne and Marty during the design was a joy and I would have liked to have spent more time in the design process, but for our house the design decisions were fairly simple and in keeping with a vintage kitchen.

The construction period was navigated with Jeremy and Adam. Jeremy was a pleasure to have in our home and did fine work, daily communication and keeping our house liveable.

Adam went the extra mile, assisting us with the following: finding our reclaimed hardwoods; hunting through bins at Hippo Hardware for the perfect match to supplement our existing hardware; and finding a vendor for new vintage vents for the kitchen.

Stockton_1929_Kitchen_D_ (4)(Check out the reclaimed hardwoods that Adam helped to source.)

Arciform asks Lead Carpenter Jeremy Gould: What are some of the things you appreciated most about working with the Stockton family?

The Stocktons were very easy to work with and just really nice people. I couldn’t have asked for better clients to work for/with. It was fun hearing the girls’ feedback each morning in the demolition phase of the project. They called me “The Destructor”!

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Jeremy adds: This was a very fun project that I think turned out very well!

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(Here is the whole Stockton clan enjoying the use of their new kitchen during the holidays.)

Arciform would like to thank Marty & Matt for opening their home for the tour and for being such inspiring clients!

Looking for more design inspiration for your kitchen? Join us for our Kitchens that Work Design Workshop on May 18th. Get the details and RSVP here by May 15th to attend FREE.

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Starting Small

by Nancy Ranchel

Did you get to the Arciform house on the Tour of Remodeled Homes last weekend? It was amazing!

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The problem with wandering through a gorgeous house is that it makes me want to start a project at my own house. Does this happen to you? Did you look at the kitchen in the tour house and think – Forget the college fund, I need new cupboards (check out the custom island Arciform / Versatile made for this house). Those ungrateful kids can take out loans.

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Is this immediately followed by a mental calculation of costs versus your current budget, plus a guilty thought about how much you like your kids? Same here – except about the kids. After just finishing a large project, I will not be starting a new one for a while – but I can dream. And dreaming means planning. And the planning is what keeps me going. If you’re dying to start a new project but the time is not right, that doesn’t mean you cannot plan – and this has serious benefits.

Susan, another Arciform client, is spending her remodeling budget this year on repairing the concrete retaining wall that keeps her yard from falling onto the sidewalk. (Safety first.) It’s a ton of money, and there will be zero satisfaction with it. She’ll be able to point to a safe sidewalk for her efforts, but wouldn’t a new bathroom be a lot more fun? Hell yeah. So Susan is starting to plan the bathroom. She met with Anne for an Initial Design Consultation (IDC in the lingo), and Anne is drawing up the plans for a second floor kid’s bathroom / bedroom re-configuration. This not only allows Susan to plan and dream, but with the plans done, she can start buying some of the items she needs for the bathroom. Spreading out the costs of the remodel is a lovely thing! And personally, if I have the plans for a project I am far less likely to spend money on shoes. I save for the project. Mostly.

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An IDC meeting with Anne or Kristyn is an affordable undertaking. Arciform can help with the shopping too – when you are ready. Getting the plans done is exciting and motivating, and you can start the work when the time is right. If you need to feel you are making progress on your house, even if no project is being started, I recommend starting to plan.

About Nancy Ranchel

Nancy is an accountant who offsets the practicality of her day job with extravagant and outrageous remodeling projects, often involving massive amounts of scrap metal.  In her free time she can be found dreaming up new ways to turn her house into an art installation, digging through scrap heaps, and contemplating a world without plastic. Check out Nancy’s blog here: www.replaceinpdx.com/

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